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John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge

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Attractions Details

📌 Address

Nashville, TN 37201, USA

Opening Hours

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

💸 Entrance Fee

Free

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expert
Colm
Local tour guide
"Try to time your walk across the John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge in Nashville with the sunset for a breathtaking view of the skyline mirrored on the Cumberland River. And for a little-known treat, head to the bridge's center on the Fourth of July or New Year's Eve, where you'll get an unobstructed view of the fireworks away from the crowded downtown events."

What is John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge?

The John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge is one of the longest pedestrian bridges in the world and an iconic landmark in Nashville, Tennessee. It spans the Cumberland River, connecting the vibrant downtown area with the residential and commercial areas of East Nashville. This bridge is not only a pathway for pedestrians but also serves as a vantage point offering stunning, panoramic views of the Nashville skyline and the river below. Known formerly as the Shelby Street Pedestrian Bridge, it has become a favorite scenic spot for locals and visitors alike.

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History of John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge

Opened in 1909 as the Shelby Street Bridge, it was originally designed for vehicular traffic and underwent several renovations throughout its history. In 1998, it was closed to vehicular traffic and subsequently refurbished and reopened in 2003 as a pedestrian bridge. It was named in honor of John Seigenthaler, a prominent journalist, editor, and influential figure in the civil rights movement, who was also known for his work with The Tennessean newspaper. The renaming occurred in 2014, paying tribute to Seigenthaler's legacy and his impactful contributions to the community.

Why is John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge Important?

The John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge is important for several reasons. It is a symbol of Nashville's dedication to preserving its history while adapting to meet the needs of modern urban life. The bridge serves as a crucial link for residents and tourists, fostering connectivity between different parts of the city. It’s also an architectural gem, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, representing Nashville's commitment to maintaining its architectural heritage. Its significance extends beyond practicality; it is a testament to the city's commitment to civil rights, embodied by the bridge's namesake.

Things to Do & See at John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge

Strolling across the bridge offers a chance to take in the beautiful vistas of Nashville, but there's more to do here than just walk. Photographers often flock to capture the perfect shot of the city's skyline, especially at sunrise or sunset. If you're in Nashville during the Fourth of July or New Year's Eve, the bridge provides a spectacular viewing spot for fireworks. And for those who want to delve into Nashville's music scene, the famed Ascend Amphitheater is situated right at the foot of the bridge on the Downtown side, hosting concerts and events within earshot of the bridge.

  • Take a leisurely walk or jog across the bridge to enjoy fresh air and scenic views.
  • Attend one of the many events or festivals that often take place at the adjacent Riverfront Park.
  • Explore the nearby Nissan Stadium, home of the Tennessee Titans, especially if you can catch a game.
  • Engage in a photography session – the bridge is one of the best spots for capturing Nashville's cityscape.
  • Visit during evening times to witness the bridge and skyline illuminated, creating a mesmerizing backdrop.

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Frequently asked questions

What is the history of the John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge?

The John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge, originally known as the Shelby Street Bridge, is a historic truss bridge that spans the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. It was opened to vehicular traffic in 1909 and was converted into a pedestrian bridge in the late 1990s. The bridge was renamed in 2014 to honor John Seigenthaler, a prominent local journalist, and civil rights advocate.

How do I access the John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge?

The John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge can be accessed from downtown Nashville at 3rd Avenue South and from the east side of the river at Shelby Avenue. The bridge is open 24 hours a day and is fully accessible to pedestrians and cyclists.

Are there any particular events or activities on the John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge?

The bridge often serves as a scenic vantage point for various events such as Fourth of July fireworks, the Music City Marathon, and other festivals in Nashville. Additionally, it is a popular spot for photography, casual walks, and cycling.

What are the best times to visit the John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge?

The best times to visit the bridge are during sunrise and sunset for picturesque views of the skyline. It is also less crowded during early morning and late evening hours, offering a peaceful experience in contrast to the bustling city life.

Is there any cost associated with visiting the John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge?

No, there is no cost to walk or cycle across the John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge. It is a public structure open to everyone and provides free access to enjoy the views and ambiance.

Attractions Details

📌 Address

Nashville, TN 37201, USA

Opening Hours

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

💸 Entrance Fee

Free

Find it on google maps