map

Mill Ends Park

icon-location-red

0.00/5 - (0 Votes)

Attractions Details

📌 Address

56 SW Taylor St, Portland, OR 97204, USA

Opening Hours

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

💸 Entrance Fee

Free

Find it on google maps

0.00/5 - (0 Votes)
expert
Colm
Local tour guide
"Even though Mill Ends Park is officially the smallest park in the world, it's easy to miss; look for it in the median strip of SW Naito Parkway near Taylor Street - it's a delightful spot for quirky photos. If you happen to visit on St. Patrick's Day, keep an eye out for leprechaun sightings and local celebrations, as the park has a whimsical history tied to these Irish fairies."

What is Mill Ends Park?

Oh, Mill Ends Park! It's quite the charming oddity nestled in the heart of Portland, Oregon. This park may be small in stature, but it's famous for its title as the smallest park in the world, as recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records. Measuring a mere two feet across, located in the median strip of SW Naito Parkway, it's the tiny green space that captures the imagination of visitors and locals alike. Now, you might wonder, how did a park this diminutive come to be? That's a story unto itself!

Our Most Popular Tour:

All-Inclusive
Chicago Instagram Walking Tour

Without  doubt, Chicago is one of the best cities in the world to explore on foot. Whatever the time of year, you’re sure to enjoy our Chicago Walkin...

US$199/pp Learn more

History of Mill Ends Park

The legacy of Mill Ends Park began as a simple hole in the ground created for a light pole that never arrived. Dick Fagan, a columnist for the Oregon Journal, spotted the neglected site from his office window and envisioned something much more. In 1948, he planted flowers and dubbed the space "Mill Ends Park," a nod to his column Mill Ends, which featured quirky and amusing stories. Over the years, the park has become a canvas for creative expressions and the subject of many local anecdotes, including tales of a leprechaun colony and an array of whimsical installations.

Amidst its evolution, the park has seen everything from miniature swimming pools for butterflies, to tiny art exhibits. Following Fagan's death in 1969, the park continued to thrive as a beloved peculiarity of Portland, embodying the city's fondness for the quirky and unusual. The people of Portland have embraced the park's small scale to showcase big creativity, regularly changing its appearance and adding diminutive displays that delight passersby.

Why is Mill Ends Park Important?

Now, you might think, "How can a park so small be important?" Mill Ends Park might just be a two-foot circle, but its significance is rooted in its ability to inspire joy and whimsy in a bustling city. It represents Portland's unique culture and its residents' appreciation for humor, art, and nature. The park serves as a reminder that even the smallest places can hold a special place in the heart of a community.

Moreover, it stands as a testament to the power of storytelling and imagination. Dick Fagan's vision brought life to this tiny patch of earth and transformed it into a symbol of playful urban intervention. It's an important landmark for Portland not just for its size, but for its enduring ability to connect people through shared smiles and a collective sense of wonder.

Our Top Trending United States Tours:

  • All-Inclusive

    Chicago Loop Architecture Private Walking Tour

    US$159/pp Learn more
  • All-Inclusive

    The Ultimate Wine Country Experience

    US$699/pp Learn more
  • All-Inclusive

    Chicago Foodie Tour: Windy City Favs

    US$239/pp Learn more

Things to Do & See at Mill Ends Park

While visiting Mill Ends Park, your experience may be brief, but it will undoubtedly be memorable. First and foremost, taking a photograph with the park is a must. It's a ritual akin to finding Waldo in a cityscape, and you'll want the proof to say you've visited the world's smallest park. Peering into the park, you may find seasonal decorations, toy figurines, or even a token left by a previous admirer.

Rotating exhibits, as transient as the seasons, mean that Mill Ends Park is ever-changing. You may stumble upon a tiny Ferris wheel, a minuscule picnic table, or a thumb-sized public protest. Observing these small wonders is like opening a new gift each time—never knowing what tiny treasure awaits. Nearby, you can visit the Saturday Market or enjoy a stroll along Tom McCall Waterfront Park for a contrast between the minuscule and the vast.

And for the enthusiast of folklore, do try your luck at spotting the invisible leprechaun who's said to be the only permanent resident of Mill Ends Park. Locals say he's quite elusive, but if you're patient, who knows? You might just catch a glimpse of 'Patrick O'Toole,' as he was affectionately named by Dick Fagan. The magic of Mill Ends Park is in these stories and the smiles they bring to all those who engage with this postage-stamp-sized piece of Portland.

Frequently asked questions

What is Mill Ends Park?

Mill Ends Park is a tiny urban park located in downtown Portland, Oregon. Known as the world's smallest park, it occupies a space of just 2 feet in diameter.

Where is Mill Ends Park located?

Mill Ends Park is situated in the median strip of SW Naito Parkway in downtown Portland, near the Willamette River.

How did Mill Ends Park come into existence?

Mill Ends Park was created by Dick Fagan, a local journalist, in 1948. He saw a hole meant for a light pole in the median strip of the road, planted flowers in it, and named it after his newspaper column, 'Mill Ends'.

What makes Mill Ends Park unique?

The uniqueness of Mill Ends Park lies in its size. At 452 square inches, it holds the Guinness World Record for the smallest park in the world.

Can visitors do anything at Mill Ends Park?

Due to its small size, there isn't much activity to be done in the park itself, but it's a charming spot to visit, take pictures, and enjoy the whimsy of this tiny public space in Portland.

Attractions Details

📌 Address

56 SW Taylor St, Portland, OR 97204, USA

Opening Hours

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

💸 Entrance Fee

Free

Find it on google maps